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New Memeber from Arkansas
02-09-2010, 10:59 AM
Post: #11
 
Brady, Did you say quail???

Dave Pepe
DWNA-VDW Breed Warden
Eagle River Wachtelhunds
dave@deutscherwachtelhund.org
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02-09-2010, 02:07 PM
Post: #12
 
Yep, quail. I know, it's a rare bird around here too. I put in some corn this year on the farm, and had a couple of decent coveys (15-20 birds) that were lurking around. I have a 5 acre native grass field in the middle of 80 acres of timber that has to hold a few birds, as well. I frost seeded a few more acres of switchgrass a couple of weeks ago and hope to convert a total of about 15-20 acres of my 180 acre farm into native grass field over the next few years.

Also Dave, there is a native prairie owned by the state just about a mile away as the crow flies that is supposed to have a decent number of birds. No pheasants in this part of the world, so we have to settle for the little guys smile.


BTW, David Powell, I meant to tell you, your dog is gorgeous. I almost bought a female from the same litter from Kraig, but decided that I wanted to drive out and see the parents of the pup I purchased, so went with Country Road Kennels.
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02-09-2010, 05:04 PM
Post: #13
 
I'm really proud of her... everyone that has seen her gushes about her looks. Of course I'm partial... biggrin But as Kraig once mentioned to me in an email, ″Looks don't hunt.″ So I'm looking forward to training her. I've never trained before so... it's going to be a learning experience.

I actually live in south Arkansas but that doesn't mean some of us southern owners can't drive to Missouri one day, it's not that far.

I'm really glad we have some discussion going here, I was getting tired of reading other dog forums biggrin

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02-09-2010, 05:57 PM
Post: #14
 
Hi Dave,
this is Piper's litter mate Paloma (Pallie). She will be mainly a dove quail and pheasant flusher/retriever. I also have never trained a dog but I am studying Richard Wolters Gun Dog and Game Dog books. Very easy to follow and totally step by step. For sale on half.com. I know you will enjoy your new pup.
We have a lot of dove shoots on our place and are now working on quail.
Good luck and maybe one day we have somewhere some sibling bonding,
Chris
http://www.cedarridgeplantation.com


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02-09-2010, 06:19 PM
Post: #15
 
What a beautiful pup and that picture looks vaguely familiar.

[Image: 100.jpg]



Wow... some of you all have some great places to hunt. Amazing, and nice website.

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02-10-2010, 09:28 AM
Post: #16
 
Dave Powell,

I have family and friends in south Arkansas (Pine Bluff, Warren, El Dorado). I went to college in Arkadelphia.

This is also my first time training a bird dog. I have used The Wildrose Retriever training video. It is a great video, but doesn't spend a great deal of time on the basics. I have used a lot of online sources to help with that. One thing that I learned that has helped step up Caliber's learning curve tremedously was a discipline technique. Whenever he breaks from a sit command or would run after the bird or bumper early, I get him, pick him up by the cheeks and bring him back to the EXACT SPOT where he broke from. It doesn't seem to hurt anything but his feelings, but he gets the point that I'm the boss IMMEDIATELY. Add in lots of love and praise when he accomplishes a task, and you have a dog that can learn almost anything. Another technique that I use for discipline is shaking his scruff vigorously when he doesn't follow a command that he knows. Again, no pain involved, but he yelps like a baby, and is ready to follow commands again right away.
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02-10-2010, 04:38 PM
Post: #17
 
Hi David,
for you FYI there is a Ronnie Smith foundation seminar in Louisville, March 12-14, if you go on http://www.gundogsupply.com (Iget my dog supplies from them)website you get more info. I'll be there with my dog. It seems to be a very good seminar and fun.
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02-10-2010, 05:04 PM
Post: #18
 
Chris, I saw that too, and now they are giving a product discount if you attend. I looked at the skills that they are teaching, and think that my little guy is already doing most of these well. I need to find someone to help me with teaching ″sit to flush″ and quartering techniques. I have read all I can on these, but it always helps to have someone that knows what the heck they're doing there to guide you. Having some live birds in hand next week will give me a start, I hope.
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02-11-2010, 12:33 AM
Post: #19
 
Brady,

Your pup will hunt naturally before you in an arch pattern. That is what Wachtelhunds do. There is no need to train him to quarter. Why train him to do something that he'll naturally come to do on his own.

In Germany, Wachtelhunds are classified as Stober hunds (dogs). The literal translation for Stober into English is to, ″ rumage about″. All you need to do is consentrate on calling him back, as a young pup, when he get's out of your comfort shotgun range. That is basically my quartering training.

Just walk him; while doing so make 45 degree oblique turns starting 15 yards in one direction and then 25 in the other. Keep doing the turns. The first time out, call him when you turn, in following sessions don't call him, unless absolutely necessary. Start now while he is young and let him stay before you. After six months of age you can forget about quartering training.

Dave Pepe
DWNA-VDW Breed Warden
Eagle River Wachtelhunds
dave@deutscherwachtelhund.org
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02-11-2010, 09:56 AM
Post: #20
 
Dave,

Thanks for the tips. That's what is great about sites like this one. I would like to see a lot more training tips and ″lessons learned″ from the guys who have ″been there done that.″ I hope that we can get more folks checking in, telling tales, and helping each other out. It's unfortunate that many of the ″new posts″ are from last year or earlier. Dialguing among ourselves is what will help keep this thing growing.

As for the quartering, I have noticed exactly what you are describing. My pup has had a lot of ″hunting″ time already. We go on daily walks in the woods and nearby fields and he covers ground exactly as you desribe. I keep my whistles on hand to call him back when needed or to work on getting him to sit at a distance. Recently, I have begun carrying the 22 with me in case the occasional squirrel or rabbit shows itself. Saw a rabbit last night, but no clear shot in the brush. My ″yard bunnies″ are on to the game, and get the heck out of dodge at first sight of us. He does some tracking, but isn't aggressively following rabbit tracks or giving voice yet. All in due time, I know.
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